Drug Abuse Awareness Week

District Observes Red Ribbon Week

Junior+High+students+Caden+Dallas+and+Maddox+Mitchell+begin+Red+Ribbon+week+with+their+interpretation+of+%22Meme%22+Monday.+Photo+by+Chloe+Bonner
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Drug Abuse Awareness Week

Junior High students Caden Dallas and Maddox Mitchell begin Red Ribbon week with their interpretation of

Junior High students Caden Dallas and Maddox Mitchell begin Red Ribbon week with their interpretation of "Meme" Monday. Photo by Chloe Bonner

Junior High students Caden Dallas and Maddox Mitchell begin Red Ribbon week with their interpretation of "Meme" Monday. Photo by Chloe Bonner

Junior High students Caden Dallas and Maddox Mitchell begin Red Ribbon week with their interpretation of "Meme" Monday. Photo by Chloe Bonner

Margie Savage, Photo Editor

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A week of dress-up days brings the excitement to students pre-K to senior.  Students select their outfits each day this week to emphasize the drug-free message of Red Ribbon Week.

Fairfield ISD participated in Red Ribbon Week from October 28 to November 1. All four campuses dressed up to join the campaign against drugs. 

“Our goal for this week was to bring about a general awareness for what a drug is,” elementary counselor Megan Winters said, “And how it can affect your body.”

This year’s theme for Red Ribbon Week is “Send a Message,” with the intention of raising more awareness of the harmful effects drugs have on the body. 

“I chose the days that I did because I wanted themes that were engaging and easy accessible for most students,” Winters said. “I also wanted to make sure they were fun and that they easily tied into the lesson for the day.”

The Elementary campus dress up days were: “Red Out” on Monday, “Mismatched Clothes” on Tuesday, “Neon and Sunglasses” on Wednesday, “Superhero Day” on Thursday, and “Pajama Day” on Friday. 

“My favorite dress up day is the superhero day,” Winters said. “The kids love dressing up and it is super fun to hear their explanations as to why they chose that specific superhero. It’s also neat to hear them describe some of the more untraditional heroes.”

The Intermediate campus dress up days were, “Red Out” on Monday, “Mismatched Clothes and Crazy Hair” on Tuesday, “Neon Tie-dye and Sunglasses” on Wednesday, “Class Shirt or College Shirts/Sports Jersey” on Thursday, and “Pajama Day/School Spirit Day” on Friday. 

“The students really enjoy anything that enables them to dress a little crazy and different–mismatched day, crazy hair day, neon colors, etc.–so the days that involve these things are always my favorite because we have so much participation,” intermediate counselor Dana Pate said. “The students walk around all day with huge smiles and there is lots of fun and laughter.”

The counselors at each of the campuses are in charge of deciding the dress up days for their respective campus. Since red represents drug awareness, most campuses began the week with a “Red Out”. 

“I do not think the dress up days alone cause students to remain drug free,” Pate said. “I think that the dress up days serve to help the students remember the announcements and lessons they hear during the week that are designed to incorporate the message of the dress up days.”

The Junior High campus dress up days were Meme Monday, Twin Tuesday, Wayback Wednesday, Trick or Treat Thursday, and Fairfield Friday. Students gathered Thursday for an assembly geared to show the positive turn life can have without drugs.

“Meme Monday was my favorite day,” eighth grader Cameron Cockerel said, “because it showed our funny and good side.”

The High School campus dress up days were “Red Out Day” on Monday, “Caps off for Drugs” on Tuesday, “College Shirt Day” on Wednesday, “Sock it to Drugs” on Thursday, and “Spirit Day” on Friday. 

“Red Ribbon Week is a great way to spread awareness of how addictions can ruin people’s lives,” sophomore Joy Stachmus said. “I have seen people throw their lives away for an addiction, and this week is a great way to inform teenagers that just one seemingly small choice can absolutely destroy your life.”